London, Emmanuel Macron, ‘Brexit’: Your Tuesday Briefing

President Emmanuel Macron’s government plans to codify into law some aspects of France’s current state of emergency, such as the ability to place people under house arrest without a judge’s prior authorization.

Meanwhile, Mr. Macron seeks to avoid a confrontation with the country’s powerful unions over his plans to overhaul the labor code. His opponents foes Marine Le Pen and Jean-Luc Mélenchon, are also preparing for a pitched battle.

_____

Photo


Credit
John Thys/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

• “Brexit” talks opened in Brussels, with the British government hanging by a thread and on a tight deadline.

For now, an initial timetable has been agreed upon. And both Britain and the E.U. said that they want to preserve Ireland’s open border.

The E.U. wants to settle ambiguities about the rights of its citizens now living in Britain, and to agree on a form of arbitration in disputes. It also wants Britain to pay the union a large but negotiable sum.

_____

Photo


Credit
Vadim Savitsky/Russian Defence, via European Pressphoto Agency

• Great power rivalries in the Middle East deepened.

Russia threatened to target American warplanes in Syrian airspace after the U.S. shot down a Syrian fighter jet. That raised the specter of direct conflict between the two powers, which back different sides in the Syrian war.

Separately, Saudi Arabia said that its navy had seized three members of Iran’s Revolutionary Guards, who it said were piloting a boat loaded with explosives toward a Saudi offshore oil rig. Iran denied the claim, saying the Saudi Navy shot at fishermen.

_____

Photo


Credit
Stephen Crowley/The New York Times

• In Washington, Republican members of Congress are quietly advancing what appears to be

Read the full article from the Source…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *